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Mapping Fallen London - Spoilers of a Sort Messages in this topic - RSS

Jenson Shepherd
Jenson Shepherd
Posts: 44

11/4/2013
Richard wrote:
Josiah Thimblerig wrote:
There was and is a real-world terminus in the area - Marylebone Station was built as the London terminus of the Great Central railway and a few surface lines still run to there. Melcombe Place is nearby - Moloch Street could be an echo? I lived in Melcombe Court for some years so know this area well.

Oh yes indeed, I've travelled through Marylebone Station many a time (I had relatives who lived in Warwick). But Moloch Street station is an underground station, and given that Hell is to the west, the line which goes there is presumably a twisted variant of the Metropolitan Line. That never terminated anywhere near Marylebone - it always ran through to Farringdon.

Someone's bound to call me on this now, so... saying that Baker Street "never was" a terminus was complete tosh, because the Bakerloo Line originally terminated there. That's (half of) why it's called Bakerloo. But it wasn't built until the 1900's :-)

Cheers
Richard


Baker Street also formed part of the original London Underground, The Metropolitan Railway, which opened in 1863. The western terminus for that was Paddington (Bishop's Road).

Technically though, any station built in London after the Fall is underground by default.


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    Proud member of Club Hesperidean
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    Richard
    Richard
    Posts: 304

    11/4/2013
    Jenson Shepherd wrote:
    The Metropolitan Railway, which opened in 1863
    You are right! I take it all back - I was out by 10 years. The Underground is a post-Fall invention, and all bets are therefore off.

    I still think it's Baker Street though ;-)

    Thanks for the correction,
    Richard
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    Diptych
    Diptych
    Administrator
    Posts: 3860

    11/4/2013
    It opened in '63, but it had been planned and plotted and worked on since the '50s. Post-Fall engineers may have simply continued the work that had already been started when they build the Underground to the underworld.

    --
    Sir Frederick, the Emancipationist Esotericist. Lord Hubris, the Bloody Baron.
    Juniper Brown, the Ill-Fated Orphan. Esther Ellis-Hall, the Fashionable Fabian.
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    ashdenej
    ashdenej
    Posts: 66

    11/19/2013
    I must say that I'm inordinately fond of the idea of the Empress living in the V&A (haw, haw), but it's unfortunately a bit too far southwest. Similarly, St. James's Palace - the official royal residence - isn't in quite the right place - although I understand that London was "warped" with the Fall, so perhaps there's hope yet.

    --
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    Richard
    Richard
    Posts: 304

    11/30/2013
    A tiny update: in the process of researching something completely different, I happened to find out that the Bow Bells were rung at nine o'clock every evening, from 1469 all the way through until 1876. (Makes you wonder why they stopped, doesn't it? When I have more time, I'll try to find out.) So, given that the Bone Bell marks the opening of the night market, I'd say that one's nailed on.

    Now we just need to figure out why Victoria quit Buckingham Palace, and my life will be complete.
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    JulietChauvelin
    JulietChauvelin
    Posts: 28

    11/30/2013
    In 1469, the Bow Bells were rung to mark the 9 o'clock curfew by order of the Common Council. The curfew was rescinded in 1876, hence the practice discontinued.

    La Chauvelin

    Richard wrote:
    A tiny update: in the process of researching something completely different, I happened to find out that the Bow Bells were rung at nine o'clock every evening, from 1469 all the way through until 1876. (Makes you wonder why they stopped, doesn't it? When I have more time, I'll try to find out.) So, given that the Bone Bell marks the opening of the night market, I'd say that one's nailed on.

    Now we just need to figure out why Victoria quit Buckingham Palace, and my life will be complete.


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    Richard
    Richard
    Posts: 304

    11/30/2013
    JulietChauvelin wrote:
    In 1469, the Bow Bells were rung to mark the 9 o'clock curfew by order of the Common Council. The curfew was rescinded in 1876, hence the practice discontinued.

    Thank you!

    (Slightly to my disappointment, I've also now found out that the bells rang every night for 400 years except on all the occasions when they didn't - like when there was nobody to ring them, or the bells were broken, or someone complained about the noise or the whole church burned down in the Great Fire Of London. Ah well. It's a nice story.)

    Cheers
    Richard
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    Verity Flyte
    Verity Flyte
    Posts: 1

    11/30/2013
    Richard wrote:
    So, OK, I buy the idea that it's Kensington Palace. It's a bit odd that it seems to be to the east of Jekyll Gardens, but maybe the Bazaar just sort of moved a bit. I hereby coin the term "spacey-wacey", the Fallen London equivalent of timey-wimey.


    I just learned about the Kensington System. However much one may resent the strictures and isolation of one's youth, one may find them comforting when one is, say, raising a brood of fishy-looking offspring and unable to tolerate music.

    It's still on the wrong side of the park, but... spacey-wacey!

    I was amused to learn that there's also real-history precedent for the Empress not living in Buckingham for the latter half of her life: "In March 1864, a protester stuck a notice on the railings of Buckingham Palace that announced 'these commanding premises to be let or sold in consequence of the late occupant's declining business'."
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    Jenson Shepherd
    Jenson Shepherd
    Posts: 44

    11/30/2013
    Verity Flyte wrote:
    Richard wrote:
    So, OK, I buy the idea that it's Kensington Palace. It's a bit odd that it seems to be to the east of Jekyll Gardens, but maybe the Bazaar just sort of moved a bit. I hereby coin the term "spacey-wacey", the Fallen London equivalent of timey-wimey.


    I just learned about the Kensington System. However much one may resent the strictures and isolation of one's youth, one may find them comforting when one is, say, raising a brood of fishy-looking offspring and unable to tolerate music.

    It's still on the wrong side of the park, but... spacey-wacey!

    I was amused to learn that there's also real-history precedent for the Empress not living in Buckingham for the latter half of her life: "In March 1864, a protester stuck a notice on the railings of Buckingham Palace that announced 'these commanding premises to be let or sold in consequence of the late occupant's declining business'."



    I was reading about that very notice just this morning. The protest in question related to the excessive period of mourning which the Queen was engaged in. Following Albert's death Victoria stayed away from Buckingham, secluding herself in Windsor Castle, Balmoral and Osborne. Although, obviously, for Fallen Londoners such a thing never happened.


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    Anstruther Barron
    Anstruther Barron
    Posts: 92

    12/11/2013
    Its possible to explore Victorian London in quite some detail here http://goo.gl/9pQAfP which may help prospective mappers

  • edited by Anstruther Barron on 12/11/2013

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    http://www.fallenlondon.com/Profile/Anstruther~Barron
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    Richard
    Richard
    Posts: 304

    1/14/2014
    Geography alert! If you have a Noman and the right Ambition, you get this:

    "An annex of the Bazaar extends past the cathedral to the rusting shadows of Beazley's Gate"

    Since we know the Bazaar is at Borough Market, the cathedral's just Southwark Cathedral - no mystery there.

    Beazley's Gate? No idea. I don't know that part of London at all well, so there might be some obvious analogue. Or, fancifully, perhaps it's an homage to Joseph Bazalgette.

    Cheers
    Richard

    PS. Lest I be tutted at (by other forum members), let me clarify that this isn't close to being the complete text of the storylet, and the forum rules say that "quotes are fine".
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    babelfishwars
    babelfishwars
    Moderator
    Posts: 1191

    1/14/2014
    Anstruther Barron wrote:
    Its possible to explore Victorian London in quite some detail here http://goo.gl/9pQAfP which may help prospective mappers


    For some reason I read that as 'prospective muggers'.

    --
    Mars, God of Fish; Leaning Tower of Fish
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    Inky Petrel
    Inky Petrel
    Posts: 370

    1/14/2014
    Anstruther Barron, that map site is amazing! Thanks! Fascinating just on a curiosity level Big Grin *pores over it*

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    Re: Fallen London, please don't invite me to things or send me things, I'm only on occasionally, so you will waste your candle smile Thank you.
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    Flidget
    Flidget
    Posts: 88

    2/27/2014
    I protest! Benthic can't possibly be UCL!

    Omnes adsint, quamvis dementi, quamvis nefasti

    Benthic College is the younger, more modern of the University's colleges. As the motto says, all are welcome here. The demonic, the soulless, the radical, even the poor.


    Younger? Younger?! We were founded three whole years before those bastards at Kings!

    Also, there's the obvious absence of Tomb Colonist Jeremy Bentham shuffling around campus.

  • edited by Flidget on 2/27/2014

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    http://fallenlondon.storynexus.com/Profile/Flidget
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    Alexis Kennedy
    Alexis Kennedy
    Posts: 1374

    2/27/2014
    That was carelessness on the part of a writer in the deep past, who I'm going to assume wasn't me because I never make mistakes. I've fixed.

    Flidget wrote:
    I protest! Benthic can't possibly be UCL!

    Omnes adsint, quamvis dementi, quamvis nefasti

    Benthic College is the younger, more modern of the University's colleges. As the motto says, all are welcome here. The demonic, the soulless, the radical, even the poor.


    Younger? Younger?! We were founded three whole years before those bastards at Kings!

    Also, there's the obvious absence of Tomb Colonist Jeremy Bentham shuffling around campus.

  • edited by Flidget on 2/27/2014


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    Diptych
    Diptych
    Administrator
    Posts: 3860

    2/27/2014
    Flidget wrote:
    Also, there's the obvious absence of Tomb Colonist Jeremy Bentham shuffling around campus.


    Well, of course he's not shuffling about. He's locked in his little cupboard.

    --
    Sir Frederick, the Emancipationist Esotericist. Lord Hubris, the Bloody Baron.
    Juniper Brown, the Ill-Fated Orphan. Esther Ellis-Hall, the Fashionable Fabian.
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    Flidget
    Flidget
    Posts: 88

    2/27/2014
    Alexis Kennedy wrote:
    That was carelessness on the part of a writer in the deep past, who I'm going to assume wasn't me because I never make mistakes. I've fixed.


    Your gracious rectification of the mistake of some unknown and probably villainous person is much appreciated!

    Sir Frederick Tanah-Chook wrote:
    Well, of course he's not shuffling about. He's locked in his little cupboard.



  • Oh come on! Even in modern non-fallen London he's occasionally allowed out to attend important meetings.

    (Although if he were actually undead maybe he'd prefer the security. One too many student pranks stealing his head and all that.)

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    http://fallenlondon.storynexus.com/Profile/Flidget
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    Loraine
    Loraine
    Posts: 6

    7/26/2014
    The London - OS Town Plan 1893-6 that can be found here is also an amazing resource and one of the most detailed maps of Victorian London I've found.
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    Dave Mongoose
    Dave Mongoose
    Posts: 8

    8/6/2014
    Sir Frederick Tanah-Chook wrote:

    Hastings Place - embassies, statue of Weeping Harold



    The proximity to embassies and the fact it's named after a battle and has a statue of one of the generals leads me to think this is the Fallen London counterpart to Trafalgar Square. Trafalgar Square was constructed between 1835 and 1843 (although the Stone Lions weren't added until 1867), so it does (mostly) pre-date the Fall.

    I think it fits with the general theme of disillusionment towards the Empire after the Fall that it was revised from commemorating a British victory over the French to reflecting a British defeat at their hands.
    edited by Dave Mongoose on 8/6/2014
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    Diptych
    Diptych
    Administrator
    Posts: 3860

    8/6/2014
    Excellent point - very likely indeed! And I've been looking at Winter's map and trying to figure out precisely where Ladybones ends and Veilgarden begins. I've got Hollow Street down as the Veilgarden/Spite border, but I'll happily accept correction from anyone who knows London better than I do; i.e., at all.

    --
    Sir Frederick, the Emancipationist Esotericist. Lord Hubris, the Bloody Baron.
    Juniper Brown, the Ill-Fated Orphan. Esther Ellis-Hall, the Fashionable Fabian.
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