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Books reminiscent of Fallen London Messages in this topic - RSS

Tess Lacoil
Tess Lacoil
Posts: 24

8/19/2012
There's a young adult novel called The Game of Triumphs by Laura Powell, whose plot involves players seeking magical prizes based around the Major Arcana of the Tarot, which I find similar to a certain card game many Fallen Londoners would be familiar with. Sadly, I wouldn't actually recommend the book itself to anyone, as I found the characters unlikable and the author's tone insulting (she claims to have been inspired by games like Dungeons & Dragons, but the way she makes connections to it makes it clear her only perspective of the game is as an outsider who views it as a frivolous and dangerous obsession). Still, based on similarities alone I thought it was worth mentioning here.
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Cedric Appleby
Cedric Appleby
Posts: 121

8/25/2012
While the setting of Metro 2033 is more Sixth or perhaps Seventh City than London (i. e. subterranean post-apocalyptic Moscow), the tone is somewhat similar, I find; you have the same subterranean living space (including implied mushroom wine!), complete with otherworldly horrors. The writing is... well, it's not Failbetter quality, but it's decent all in all (if feeling a bit rushed at times). The ending is extremely bleak, but it's quite an enjoyable read, I'd say.
edited by Cedric Appleby on 8/25/2012

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streetfelineblue
streetfelineblue
Posts: 1459

9/17/2012
Wieland Burandt wrote:
WintersNight wrote:
I sincerely recommend Perdido Street Station by China Mieville. Watch a steampunk scientist (read: wizard) and his insectoid girlfriend hunt, what is essentially, The Vake.

China Miéville absolutely effing rules. I will say no more. smile


I followed the advice (and a former, pleasant experience with The city & the city) and I have to say, Perdido Street Station rocks. It manages its bulk of 800 pages (in the italian translation) without losing pace or interest. Also, it's adorably weird (the insectoid girlfriend should hint you).

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Karis Fra Mauro
Karis Fra Mauro
Posts: 47

6/13/2013
Branden Linton wrote:
A book reminiscent of seeking the name. House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski. Never have I read a book so intricately designed to portray ones subtle decent into madness. It's very experimental in its design with odd page layouts and ever jumping around notes and side-stories this gives the novel a manic feel unlike any other. I think its one of those underground classics that truly deserves its status. Go to your local bookstore I grantee they will have one copy, they always do. Flip trough the book if your not taken in by the rapid change of content I don't know what would convince you to read it. Seriously through best horror novel I've ever read.

I have other books I'd suggest I just need to find a way to connect them to Fallen London first. =p
edited by Cubethulhu on 8/15/2012


Funny you should mention that book, I was given a copy by a coworker when my company decided to reassign me elsewhere. Genuinely spooky and I'm still not entirely sure how the gift was intended... In any event I am reminded of the writings of Jack Vance (a name bound to resonate) with the flair of this game if not so much specifics. And do I detect a nod to the neglected master of aquatic horror (and Lovecraftian contemporary prior to his untimely demise in the great war), William Hope Hodgeson?
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Cocytus
Cocytus
Posts: 187

6/14/2013
Kim Newman's Anno Dracula (just the first one, though perhaps The Bloody Red Baron would be World War I from an Fallen Londonish perspective?) and Diogenes Club series seem quite appropriate here, with the first taking place in an alternate history in which Dracula defeated the heroes (antagonists?) of his eponymous novel, and reigns over Britain at the side of Queen Victoria. There's also a Jack wandering around...

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Karaeir
Karaeir
Posts: 90

6/15/2013
Catherynne M. Valente's Palimpsest. It is about the city 'between life and death, dreaming and waking, at the train stop beyond the end of the world'. I absolutely adored beautiful, lush, heavily stylized writing and dreamlike feeling of this book. At the same time it seems that many people have problem with just that - it's almost exhausting to read. Also, the book contains a lot of erotic stuff (or actually not really erotic, just sad) so don't even try to read it if that's not your thing.

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Erik Vimes
Erik Vimes
Posts: 182

6/16/2013
The book isn't reminiscent of Echo Bazaar but just look at the title and cover



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    Nigel Overstreet
    Nigel Overstreet
    Posts: 1220

    6/18/2013
    If you haven't read Johnathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke, then stop what you are doing this instant and pick it up. It's ideal Fallen London pastiche
    !

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    Jack Vaux-Harrowden
    Jack Vaux-Harrowden
    Posts: 246

    6/18/2013
    Karaeir wrote:
    Also, the book contains a lot of erotic stuff (or actually not really erotic, just sad) so don't even try to read it if that's not your thing.


    That's so very much not my thing, and I loved Palimpsest anyway.
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    babelfishwars
    babelfishwars
    Administrator
    Posts: 1174

    6/20/2013
    streetfelineblue wrote:
    Wieland Burandt wrote:
    WintersNight wrote:
    I sincerely recommend Perdido Street Station by China Mieville. Watch a steampunk scientist (read: wizard) and his insectoid girlfriend hunt, what is essentially, The Vake.

    China Miéville absolutely effing rules. I will say no more. smile


    I followed the advice (and a former, pleasant experience with The city & the city) and I have to say, Perdido Street Station rocks. It manages its bulk of 800 pages (in the italian translation) without losing pace or interest. Also, it's adorably weird (the insectoid girlfriend should hint you).


    NOT really A SPOILER, don't know how to spoiler tag anyway.

    In constrast, I found it immensely well written but soul crushing. I don't demand books be happy, far from it ... but ... but ... it has permanently scarred me in a dark and miserable way. It has not made me a better person. Or a happier person.
    That's not a disrecommendation - just a ... warning, perhaps?

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    Victourist
    Victourist
    Posts: 6

    7/24/2013
    If graphic novels count then we should add Alan Moore's "From Hell" to this list. It's far less hilarous and more brutal than FL, but it gives a brilliant atmosphere of dark, poor London and secrets hidden deep in the city's history.

    Besides, I think that any book taking place in Sigil (from D&D setting Planescape) counts. This place is ruled by an enigmatic and invincible being (Lady of Pain), is full of grotesque persons from a thousand races and often seems to trap its inhabitants. Sounds a lot like FL.
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    Joy Phillip
    Joy Phillip
    Posts: 177

    7/24/2013
    I personally haven't read any of these, but one "flavor" book that I found to be really good for getting me in the mindset is "Those who hunt the night" by Barbara Hambly. A Victorian detective and his wife who are working with vampires to find the people killing the vampires. It's interesting. Well before the Steampunk genre.

    Also, just for another flavor thing, Girl Genius by Phil Foglio is really steampunk and invention, so it's another for flavor and mood building.

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    Playersideblog
    Playersideblog
    Posts: 397

    7/26/2013
    Erik Vimes wrote:
    The book isn't reminiscent of Echo Bazaar but just look at the title and cover


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    Victourist
    Victourist
    Posts: 6

    9/16/2013
    It's not a fantasy book and it doesn't take place in London, but Morton's "Rotschilds" is full of filthy rich Victorian chessmasters treating entire Europe as their playground - something that heavily reminds me of certain people (and creatures?) in Fallen London.
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    KatarinaNavane
    KatarinaNavane
    Posts: 462

    9/18/2013
    I came in to mention that I had just been re-reading From Hell and add that, but it has already been mentioned, so I will give it a 'ditto'. Same goes for Neverwhere and Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norell.

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    Dr. Hieronymous Alloy
    Dr. Hieronymous Alloy
    Posts: 228

    12/9/2013
    I've been reading the Campion series by Margery Allingham lately and it's surprisingly reminiscent of Fallen London. It was written in the 30's (well, the first few books were) and it's basically a light-hearted parody of the "cosy" mystery novels in vogue in the 30's and before (Campion was originally a parody of Lord Peter Whimsy and then developed into his own character).


  • The funny thing is that because it's a very light parody of early 1900's British mysteries, there's a lot of thematic and tonal overlap with Fallen London -- not so much in the fantasy elements of course, but more on the comic tone of the writing, because both are riffing off of the same sort of Edwardian style. It really leapt out at me at one point when the cast list for one of the books contained names like



    A Person of Importance
    A Vulgarian in the service of Mr Campion
    Elder sister of
    The Miller of Pontisbright
    Brother of Mary and Amanda and heir to the missing title
    An American lady; aunt to Mary, Hal and Amanda
    A Villain




    Anyway, they're not exactly high literature or wildly original -- the solution to one of the books is lifted straight from The Problem of Thor Bridge -- but they're fun and very Fallen London.

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    Nathanael S. Wells
    Nathanael S. Wells
    Posts: 80

    12/9/2013
    Beyond the Wall of Sleep, a short story by H. P. Lovecraft, reminded me a lot of Fallen London, to the point where it coloured some of my theories on the physics and metaphysics of the Judgements. It's not really the Fifth City or the Neath or its many obscure wonders that the story makes me recall, however. It is the relation between Judgements, celestial bodies, and peering things in jars that the story makes me think of.

    But I presume that it makes much more sense if you spent Fate twice (once on assisting a Tartar Priest, and once on leaving the Long Road) and not so much sense if you did not...


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    dragonridingsorceress
    dragonridingsorceress
    Posts: 622

    12/9/2013
    Twoflower wrote:
    A lot of the City Watch books in the Discworld series remind me of Fallen London, especially the Velocipede Squad.


    I second this suggestion!

    In Young Adult books, there's the Bartimaeus Sequence by Jonathan Stroud. Magicians summoning demons to do their dirty work and playing with politics?
    It is supposedly set in an alternate version of the "modern" world, but there was a rather Victorian/FL feel to it (at least to my mind), what with apprentice magicians, demons, and a rebellion with unclear motives and strange leaders beginning to form. I've only read the first one so far, but I enjoyed it.

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    NinjaComedian
    NinjaComedian
    Posts: 202

    12/9/2013
    Woogawoman wrote:
    I can't say it's exactly reminiscent of Fallen London, but I highly recommend Tim Powers' The Anubis Gates. Time travel, Egyptian Gods, body swapping werewolves, evil clowns and gypsies, urchins... how can it not be made of win? Big Grin

    I came into this thread to post... pretty much exactly that. Anubis Gates is a kick ass novel.
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    Four
    Four
    Posts: 18

    12/11/2013
    I'm surprised to see Jonathan Barnes' The Somnambulist and The Domino Men not yet mentioned. It is now done.

  • edited by Four on 12/11/2013
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