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August’s Exceptional Story: Required Repairs Messages in this topic - RSS

phryne
phryne
Posts: 1043

8/12/2018
I seem to be one of few people who liked the chase sequence. I'm not looking for adrenaline when playing FL - indeed, the fact that I record every piece of ES text in a word doc means I play at snail's pace - so I didn't mind its sedate, labyrinthine manner. It felt appropriate, since my char wouldn't chase through these tunnels in a rage, but rather pick their way carefully through them. The result from the 'Sample the local fungi' storylet was hilarious, as was the option to make tea in the middle of your lodgings overflowing - probably the most British thing I've ever done in FL wink

For someone who's played every ES, this one won't achieve a top ranking, but it was fun and kept me entertained for an evening. No complaints, and looking forward to the Season ending! smile
edited by phryne on 8/12/2018

--
"Expect little, and little will disappoint you. But day after day, I expect as little as I can, as little as I can bring myself to, and still I find myself disappointed."
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Nudraxon
Nudraxon
Posts: 13

8/14/2018
Dudebro Pyro wrote:
Nudraxon wrote:
I feel that the whole "This is a very bad idea. Do not do this" warning is becoming a bit overused. When it is used for options that are only bad from a narrative standpoint, it lessens the effect for truly bad choices which will permanently damage your character (i.e. Seeking).

I personally think consequences almost solely matter from a narrative standpoint. You pay material costs all the time, most people will go to the menace areas all the time, and it's easy to regrind almost anything (that isn't worth more than a few hundred echoes) or get back out of any menace area. Is gambling for a yacht a Bad Idea? It has severe and expensive material consequences, unless you get very lucky. In that sense, the entirety of Seeking can be viewed as just a storyline to "buy" the Knock, just as long as you turn around (not turning around might well be the one mechanical Bad Idea, and is certainly the only one I can think of). It's an expensive Knock - much, much more so than, say, the aforementioned Yacht - but that doesn't make it bad, just expensive.
So really, the only reason Seeking is considered "bad" is due to the narrative setting (and the option to literally render your character unplayable - but that's a clear choice, so from a purely mechanical standpoint doesn't matter when considering the rest of the storyline). Imagine if Seeking was framed as an epic and lengthy quest to obtain, I don't know, a Condensed Crystal of Mountain-Light from the Garden that grants you as much life as the Presbyter himself and mechanically is a +4 BDR item - would it still be considered a bad idea? All the menaces and item loss could be framed as a consequnce of the dangers of going after an extremely rare and highly guarded artefact. It could retain all of its character-draining potential (mechanically), with the exact same reward (mechanically), but without the narrative backing, it would be hailed as an epic quest for a rare prize rather than a Bad Idea.

One way I might consider something a Bad Idea mechanically is if it takes away a unique item you can't get back (or have to spend an inordinate amount of effort getting back - I wouldn't want to lose a Cider or a Knock, of course). And yet even then, every three months a storylet appears that takes away three completely unique items that are only re-obtainable through Fate, with the reward almost always being an ordinary tier 6 item (and some lore), and almost everybody waits for these storylets with impatience - because of the narrative framing playing it up as a Good Idea and a natural thing you're expected to play through.
edited by Dudebro Pyro on 8/1/2018


I was thinking of the "bad idea" near the end of The Rat-Catcher, in which you can give up a valuable companion and damage all of your stats for exactly zero mechanical benefit. I picked that option, and don't regret it one bit. I loved it not just for the vague but intriguing lore it offered, but also because it gave the feeling of seeing something that I wasn't meant to see, which is very rare in a game where you know, on some level, that everything you are "discovering" was actually put there deliberately for you to find. This is what I think the "This is a bad idea" warning should be reserved for: choices which are a bad idea from both a narrative and mechanical standpoint, and provide no upside except to satisfy your own perverted curiosity. Which is also how I view Seeking (I don't plan on taking the Knock). In these cases the warning is just that, a warning for players who don't want to lose progress or for bad things to happen to their characters to stay away. (For example, there's that one option in SMEN that halves your watchful stat, with no guarantee of even advancing SMEN.)

By contrast, in this story, taking the "bad" ending gives you a pretty valuable companion, with the only downside being your potential revulsion at what has happened to you (and, to be clear, I loved this ending). I think for options such as this, it would be better to hint at the bad things to come in the regular text of the option, rather than using the fourth-wall-breaking bold and italics text to issue a warning.
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Nudraxon
Nudraxon
Posts: 13

8/14/2018
Optimatum wrote:
How many "This is a very bad idea" warnings are there in Fallen London? I can only recall three off the top of my head: SMEN-related choices (in general), drinking from the Wound in Flint, and this. SMEN is obviously incredibly harmful both naratively and mechanically. Drinking is harmful mechanically, but rather mundane naratively. This is only notably harmful in narrative.

Come to think of it, some of the examples I was thinking of are actually in Sunless Sea, so if you haven't played that, my complaint applies considerably less. (There's also the choice near the end of The Rat-Catcher, which I just spent almost a paragraph gushing over in my previous post.)
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Lazaroth
Lazaroth
Posts: 58

8/17/2018
Having finally got to playing this, I have realized something.

[spoiler]The Blind Monks in the Observatory have very likely had their eyes replaced with spiders.[/spoiler]
edited by Lazaroth on 8/20/2018

--
The Perspicacious Romantic — When all the world is washed away by misery, something beautiful will still remain.
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Dudebro Pyro
Dudebro Pyro
Posts: 606

8/17/2018
Is the Observatory otherwise connected with spiders? Because a lot of its astronomers are blind, so I just assumed the Blind Monk was just more of the same.
Unless I completely missed some other connection, in which case you might be quite right and in fact the entire observatory could be incubating spiders.

--
Dudebro Pyro, eccentric scholar

Spare Starveling Kitties always welcome. I collect them.
For that matter, send me your unwanted cat boxes too.
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suinicide
suinicide
Posts: 2403

8/17/2018
The entire observatory is in fact filled with spider worshipping, eye sacrificing, cultists.

--
http://fallenlondon.storynexus.com/profile/sunnytime
A gentleman seeking the liberation of knowledge, with a penchant for violence.
RIP suinicide, stuck in a well. Still has it under control.
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Dudebro Pyro
Dudebro Pyro
Posts: 606

8/17/2018
Oh. I must have totally missed that.

--
Dudebro Pyro, eccentric scholar

Spare Starveling Kitties always welcome. I collect them.
For that matter, send me your unwanted cat boxes too.
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maylee henst
maylee henst
Posts: 14

8/21/2018
I'm still confused a bit about the lore, do sorrow spiders control their hosts?
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elderfleur
elderfleur
Posts: 29

8/21/2018
maylee henst wrote:
I'm still confused a bit about the lore, do sorrow spiders control their hosts?

They don't control people in a direct fashion, although I believe bad behaviour is groomed out with liberal nibbling. I think most cultists are just lonely enough that they're happy to have regular event nights with their new cult friends, even if it's Construction Night In The Sewers 9 times out of 10.

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—Elderfleur
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Deathjack999
Deathjack999
Posts: 58

8/28/2018
suinicide wrote:
The entire observatory is in fact filled with spider worshipping, eye sacrificing, cultists.

Why isn't there a Non-SMEN option to get rid of one of the keys to your lodgings in exchange for its going price at Penstocks?
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dov
dov
Posts: 2489

8/28/2018
Deathjack999 wrote:
Why isn't there a Non-SMEN option to get rid of one of the keys to your lodgings in exchange for its going price at Penstocks?

Lots of players would have loved even the option to get rid of lodgings keys for free :-)

--
Want a sip of Hesperidean Cider? Send me a request in-game. Here's an_ocelot's guide how.
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Vega
Vega
Posts: 77

9/10/2018
I have now played this, and enjoyed it.

I echo the common sentiment that the start was whimsical and enjoyable, the chase under the lodgings was a bit of a drag in gameplay (it drained some impact out of the punchlines), but it still served the gradual revelation quite well. The ending was satisfying and I was happy with my choice.

What I appreciate most about Required Repairs is that it had a lighter, more comedic tone. Before this, I had played Written in the Glim and before that, a few of the ES that were on sale earlier (The Gift, Lost in Reflections, HOJOTOHO!) -- all of which had intense, even sombre tones. So this story was a nice change of pace, where the drama of your lodgings breaking down was cast in comedy -- I mean, monkey hair to repair the wall plaster! stuffing rats into the gas pipe! taking tea while your rooms flood!
So I think the randomness of the chase sequence, though tiresome in gameplay, was fitting for the tone of the game.

The revelation about the spider-council's plans was cleverly done on both a character and a meta level. I have an idea of FL's deep lore but don't follow the theorizing on the forums that much. I thought the spider-council's plan was a huge lore reveal, but so far-fetched that I didn't know how to place it in my current frames of reference for lore. As far as my character was concerned, it was a revelation too great for real comprehension. So, riding on the story's tone... it seemed most befitting to pick the whimsical choice and help with the excavations. I found it hilarious that my character co-opted the Council work crew to repair the floor of the lodgings. An apt comedic conclusion to a comedic story.

I think this ES is quite subtle overall. The game mechanics may not have been the best, but the atmosphere and structure was well made. And I thought the double-entendre of Borough Council was genius. I literally had a lightbulb moment partway through -- "oh, ohhhhh, it's that kind of council!"

I was satisfied. It doesn't have the drama and memorableness of some other ES, but it was a nice light-hearted caper.

--
The Shifty Spectre and The Jaunty Mystic.
Accepting all Acquaintances, social interactions and opportunities for casual in-game roleplay.
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