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2 min ago
Topic:
FLR: The Cheery Man and The Last Constable

dov
dov
Posts: 1998
Anne Auclair wrote:

There will still be a number of people who reset multiple times. So it would still be an exploitative system.

Agreed (on the number of times, not necessarily about it being exploitative).

I just wanted to explain why the expected average number of reset attempts would be 1.
13 min ago
Topic:
Selling Sunlight! (Kickstarter by incubee at FBG)

Anne Auclair
Anne Auclair
Posts: 1620
35 hours and only 533 Euros to go in order to meet the stretch goal: a domed city of glass, where you can fall in love with the Sun! The Sun! The Sun!


edited by Anne Auclair on 10/23/2017
14 min ago
Topic:
Fallen London Reworks: Returning to Court

Anne Auclair
Anne Auclair
Posts: 1620
I really like the world building. A lot of the options involve either influences from Hell or the Elder Continent. London is in pretty regular contact with Hell, what with the railroad and the Brass Embassy and all the Infernal commerce they bring. Then there's London's colony on the Carnelian coast, where you served a number of terms playing nice with the Tigers. So of course those two civilizations would have a rather large impact on the Fifth city's culture.
34 min ago
Topic:
Fallen London Reworks: Returning to Court

Catherine Raymond
Catherine Raymond
Posts: 1758
MidnightVoyager wrote:
I wish making a suit gave me the suit. But eh.


Of course it doesn't! You're making it for the reputation it gives, and for the money. But it would be nice to have the option of making a fashion item for one's self.
35 min ago
Topic:
NPCs status within London (PoSI and so on)

Sir Frederick Tanah-Chook
Sir Frederick Tanah-Chook
Administrator
Posts: 2994
It's a very interesting question. I think we can identify a few clear specialists - the Gracious Widow is one of the most Shadowy people in London, literally and figuratively. Sinning Jenny is quite exceptionally Persuasive. Few are more Watchful than the Implacable Detective. And so on. Are there any Paramount Presences - any who excel at everything they do?
44 min ago
Topic:
Fallen London Reworks: Returning to Court

MidnightVoyager
MidnightVoyager
Posts: 680
I wish making a suit gave me the suit. But eh.
1 hours ago
Topic:
NPCs status within London (PoSI and so on)

Anchovies
Anchovies
Posts: 342
His Amused Lordship: central to the Dilmun Club and Web of the Motherlings; involved in Diocesan Intrigue, Matters of State at Port Carnelian, and The Waltz That Moved the World

The Bishop of St Fiacre's: central to Flint, the Dilmun Club, Heart's Desire, and third-tier Renown: Church increase; involved in Diocesan Intrigue

The Bishop of Southwark: central to Diocesan Intrigue, Election 1894, third-tier Renown: Church increase, and Renown: Church 25 reward; appears on Church faction card

The Duchess: central to Name Signed with a Flourish and In Search of a Stiff Drink; involved in Name in Seven Secret Alphabets, Diocesan Intrigue, and Affair of the Box

The Gracious Widow: central to Name Whispered in Darkness, In Search of a Stiff Drink, Affair of the Box, and Season of Skies; appears in Bag a Legend

The Cheery Man: central to Name Whispered in Darkness and Family and Law; appears in Cut With Moonlight

The Topsy King: central to Name Whispered in Darkness and Heart's Desire; appears in War of Assassins

Feducci: central to Name Scrawled in Blood and Election 1895; appears in the Foreign Office, Associating with Radical Academics, The Stone Guest, and Nemesis

Veteran Privy Counselor: central to Name Signed with a Flourish; appears in the Foreign Office, The Stone Guest, and Society faction card

Sinning Jenny: central to The Empress's Shadow and Election 1894; appears in Bag a Legend

The Jovial Contrarian: central to Election 1894 and Investigating the Affluent Photographer; appears at parties

The Implacable Detective: central to the Dilmun Club and Election 1895; appears in Intimate with a Secular Missionary and Constables faction card

The Dauntless Temperance Campaigner: central to Election 1895

The Manager of the Royal Bethlehem Hotel: central to A Merry Gentleman, Season of Ruins, Heart's Desire, and Renown: Revolutionaries 40 reward

Dr Gideon Orthos: central to Name in Seven Secret Alphabets and Voyage of Scientific Discovery

Mr Huffam, esq: appears in Diocesan Intrigue and An Editor of Newspapers
edited by Anchovies on 10/23/2017
1 hours ago
Topic:
Fallen London Reworks: Returning to Court

Kaigen
Kaigen
Posts: 483
Now that we have yet more things to publish, perhaps it would be appropriate to move them to a "publications" category in the inventory? It would be nice to have a shelf devoted to my own works, and it would relieve some of the bloat in the curiosities section.
1 hours ago
Topic:
Fallen London Reworks: Returning to Court

Slyblue
Slyblue
Posts: 122
Akernis wrote:

What option is this? I have never seen that text before.
.
edited by Akernis on 10/23/2017


New ballet option! You need 5 Renown: Hell, and it's enough to get your Scandal from 6 to 8 (Not sure how much CP that would be. But it's definitely worth it.)
1 hours ago
Topic:
I mean weasels are cool I guess

Catherine Raymond
Catherine Raymond
Posts: 1758
The Dark Gentleman wrote:
...Conservatively, there's at least 7 tons of frolicking weasel mass cavorting about London right now. Where were we KEEPING them before now? And a related question: what is the ventilation situation in the Neath at the moment? Whatever it is, it is not enough...

They *are* weasels, after all--slender and energetic. I bet the ones that have never died before scamper between the Neath and the Surface on a regular basis. :-)
2 hours ago
Topic:
I mean weasels are cool I guess

Jolanda Swan
Jolanda Swan
Posts: 281
Weaseller is the only quality I allowed to replace the Shepherd of Souls in my mantel!
They make me happy, pure and simple.
2 hours ago
Topic:
Returning to Court- Laureate Among Poets: A Guide

Waterpls
Waterpls
Posts: 126
Thanks, its very useful.
2 hours ago
Topic:
Fallen London Reworks: Returning to Court

Akernis
Akernis
Posts: 185
Slyblue wrote:
"The chorus of goat-demons shambles about the stage, until their pas de sept, when they transition to a choreographed display of such grace that even the Captivating Princess has tears in her eyes."

So why, exactly, am I getting exiled for this?

Psh.

What option is this? I have never seen that text before.
.
edited by Akernis on 10/23/2017
3 hours ago
Topic:
FLR: The Cheery Man and The Last Constable

Prospero Rune
Prospero Rune
Posts: 66
I don't profess to be even minutely as versed in FL lore as others who post here. Having reached a certain age, my brain no longer absorbs and stores information as well as it did in my youth. Frankly, I don't give a fig that I can't remember all the nuances of characters and events. The writing is lovely, and that's all I really care about.

That being said, I am quite satisfied with the conclusion of this story. It was clear to me from the beginning that this story would not end happily. How could it? A father who raised a daughter to uphold and defend a code of honor, even when that code contradicted his own. He could not change her allegiance to upholding the law, any more than she could change his from flouting the law. How else should two family members who espouse two diametrically opposed viewpoints resolve their differences? I could not imagine a more apropos ending than the two facing each other in the manner that would be familiar, even honorable, to them both. Their tremulous relationship needed to be resolved - how else but through permanent death?

So go the ravings of an old woman.
3 hours ago
Topic:
Returning to Court- Laureate Among Poets: A Guide

Kaigen
Kaigen
Posts: 483
A Rousing Hymn gives you Foxfire Candle Stubs, which can be exchanged in bulk for Rostygold, along with a Mystery of the Elder Continent and a Church Favour, from a card drawn in Spite. Handy if you're like me and frequently pour Rostygold into funding comedic performances from the Young Stags and zee trips.
3 hours ago
Topic:
FLR: The Cheery Man and The Last Constable

MidnightVoyager
MidnightVoyager
Posts: 680
I think they took the block out when they made the change. You might want to e-mail support at support@failbettergames.com about it. Some people have had problems progressing the story/
3 hours ago
Topic:
FLR: The Cheery Man and The Last Constable

heavensdark
heavensdark
Posts: 57
Not sure if this has been answered since I see a lot of unhappy people but I have a question. I've been away and seeing 13 pages in this thread is daunting when skimming for an answer so I apologize if this has been covered but I seem to have gotten myself stuck. I went into Gathering Cantigaster Venom and backed out because I did not have enough actions at the time to prepare. I went back into it later to see that it wouldn't let me click either option anymore. I figured since it mentioned a heist that I would head to the Flit and prepare for a heist that way. That didn't work either. I am still locked out of this. Is this the block I face that FBG put in to prevent me from reaching the ending or am I missing something?
edited by heavensdark on 10/23/2017
4 hours ago
Topic:
FLR: The Cheery Man and The Last Constable

MidnightVoyager
MidnightVoyager
Posts: 680
I mean, all that you've said kinda sounds like you agree with me but like it instead? You use words that make it sound pretty, but it's just utterly dire and devoid of anything other than depression.

It's not necessarily revenge, but the story to a point (on the Cheery Man's side) made me wonder why they were so keen on this. It REALLY seemed like he was just going to murder his kid because she came back to London to put flowers on her mom's grave. Maybe the Constable's side made more sense!

I don't feel for a second like one or the other dying will help even if they are dead inside already. Especially then. You might as well go for the double death in that case. Being complicit in the death of their loved one, even if they're bitter toward each other, can only make things worse, even if they didn't do it directly. Their war is ended, but the reason for that war is still alive in their heads.

What have I learned from it? Nothing, so I don't really matter as a medium. I got absolutely nothing out of this story except for a vague sense of irritation, depression, and wasted everything.

(also sorry, I've never read or seen Harry Potter, so your example is going over my head)
4 hours ago
Topic:
Numerology and the Name: A Calculated Coincidence?

Arden Saint-Just
Arden Saint-Just
Posts: 13
Abstract:
By applying an alphanumberic coding system with a seven motif to the names of the seven False Saints of Seeking fame, we arrive at a collective value of 49, which simplifies to seven sevens. Given the convoluted nature of the whole endeavor and its relatively subjective structure, it is unlikely that this is intentional, but it wouldn't be the biggest stretch considering the depths of Alexis Kennedy's knowledge. No it... would actually be a pretty big stretch. I'm kinda sure this wasn't intentional. But maybe it was. Huh? Huh? Who knows, huh, who even knows?

The Actual Content:
Let's begin with numerology. More specifically, gematria. The latter is, most essentially...
...an Assyro-Babylonian-Greek system of alphanumeric code/cipher... that assigns numerical value to a word/name/phrase in the belief that words or phrases with identical numerical values bear some relation to each other or bear some relation to the number itself as it may apply to Nature, a person's age, the calendar year, or the like. Similar systems, some of which were derived from or inspired by Hebrew gematria, have been used in other languages and cultures, i.e. Greek isopsephy, Arabic abjad numerals, and English gematria.
Cool stuff, fun to mess around with, it keeps me busy during particularly tedious lectures. I'm only an occultist by the most generous, non-committal definitions, so I can't give much more than the above overview. Suffice it to say that at some point in the past two years I got into metaphysics as a hobby and settled on a derivation of this fellow's frameworks which, entirely by chance, happened to be a base-seven system. To make it more apparent:



In this way, it's a straightforward matter to turn a word or words into a number of varying size. My preference (not an uncommon one) is to simplify the results to a certain extent. For example:



Through tinkering I arrived at a limit of 13. That is, keep simplifying until the result is 13 or less, that final number being the value of the word/phrase. This isn't a hard-and-fast rule; I tend to pick an overarching concept and shoot to find a way to nudge it into yielding the result I want, as in the above. Some would call that cheating, but keep in mind that any strictly prescribed system of metaphysical thought probably just... well, it probably can be traced back to the narcissism of some patriarchal figure in the tradition's history and who needs that, huh? Not this guy. So anyway, take the above example: It is inarguable that MR EATEN ought to equal 7. That's the number, after all. That's what this is all about. I got lucky, I didn't have to tweak anything, abiding by the 7 motif with a cutoff of 13 yielded the correct result. I discovered this while doodling during a sociological statistics seminar. At that point I could either be Freed From the Name and actually take notes on coding surveys for studying urban populations, OR I could try to apply the aforementioned system to other Seeking-related things. Naturally I went with the latter, to initially underwhelming effect:



As you can see, the values of each candle are all over the place, they don't necessarily tell us anything, but when the simplified values are added up we get 49. Glorious, glorious 49. Seven sevens. Another way of saying that is that the average value of each candle is 7. If this isn't to your liking, it is possible to adjust as follows: remove "ST" from each candle, set the cap at a single digit, resulting in:



I'm less partial to this one, personally, but since it still yields a very pertinent result, I figured I'd toss it out there.

Discussion:
A note on the sixth candle. I'm aware that Alexis once pointed out that the inconsistency between its being named "Forthigan" and "Fortigan" is intentional. However, adding the "h" to either series of calculations renders them meaningless. "Forthigan" poses a stumbling block while "Fortigan" fits perfectly. I (sincerely) doubt this sheds any light on the matter and if there have been developments I missed in which one spelling is given precedence over the other, do inform me.
If I've made a careless error that invalidates the whole thing, my response is "oops" and "I'm very sorry". I checked it three times but seven would have probably been more prudent. Frankly, I do not care for numbers. Can't pretend I'm 100% confident in even the rudimentary operations above.
In conclusion, nothing is actually learned here, but boy, didn't we have a swell time?
edited by Saint-Just on 10/22/2017
4 hours ago
Topic:
FLR: The Cheery Man and The Last Constable

Chrisotoph
Chrisotoph
Posts: 15
@MidnightVoyager: But I don't think - and this may really be an imression gained from personal interpretation than from content - that this is simply about revenge. This is a family torn apart, but still secretly a family, bound by among other things, as you said, loss of a loved one, and yet they have struggled against each other without hope of reconciliation for years. My point is not that they wouldn't blame themselves for their lives after the other's death, but that they probably already have been bittered of their actions (against somebody whom they probably feel they should love) to the point that the game is the least painful course of action. The game, which, I must add, is not a duel. They both submit willingly to it to end their conflict: in a way they both accept death over whatever future they may have together. To me this signified that they both admit to having been dead now for a while, since what they have now, the conflict, in which every step must tear at their heart a bit, is not life. They resign this life for an end to their war: and maybe they will have to live with their memories, but both of them have shown a great capacity of doing so.

I have unfortunately never completed dragon age: but you have mentioned Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet and Macbeth, and all of these plays reflect extensively on the audience's role as a medium which remembers and learns from the way their heroes choose to end their struggles. Thinking about this I was also reminded a bit of the death of Sirius Black in Harry Potter: when a friend of mine first read it, she was very upset with the novel and the author in general for killing Sirius: and my argument then, as now, was that he at that point has already been dead, most of all, to himself.




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